Key Elements Of A Health And Safety Management System

  • Reviewed By: M. Suleman (Safety Officer, GRADIOSH)

In today’s increasingly regulated business environment, it’s essential to understand the role of a Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) in minimizing risks and fostering a safe working environment. An effective HSMS protects employees and contributes to the organization’s overall efficiency and success.

This comprehensive guide will take you through the key elements of a Health and Safety Management System, its benefits, major components, characteristics, and implementation process. Regardless of your business size or industry, the insights offered in this post will help you create a safer, more secure workplace that boosts employee morale, preserves your company’s reputation, and complies with all necessary legal requirements. So, let’s delve into the world of health and safety management systems, exploring the vital role they play in our workplaces.

Health And Safety Management System

Health And Safety Management System

A Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) is a set of processes and procedures that help an organization manage its health and safety risks. It can identify, assess, control, and monitor health and safety risks. A Health and Safety Management System can be designed to meet an organization’s specific needs. It should consider the organization’s size, type of business, and the nature of its work. This blog post will discuss the key elements of a Health and Safety Management System and how it can benefit your business.

Most key elements required for effective health and safety management are similar to those required for good quality, finance, and general business management. Commercially successful organizations usually have good health and safety management systems in place. Good and effective management principles provide a sound basis for improving health and safety performance.

When it comes to health and safety management systems, there are several benefits that businesses can reap.

For instance, an effective health and safety management system can help businesses to:

  • Minimize the risks of workplace accidents and injuries
  • Comply with relevant health and safety laws and regulations
  • Improve employee morale and motivation
  • Enhance the company’s image and reputation
  • Reduce workers’ compensation costs

As you can see, there are several reasons why businesses should implement an effective health and safety management system.

HSE Management System Elements

Key Elements Of Health And Safety Management System

The HSE document HSG65, Managing for health and safety, describes the occupational health and safety management system used extensively in the UK. This is the principal one required for the NEBOSH National General Certificate course. In 2013, the HSE’s guidance in HSG65 moved from using the POPMAR model (Policy, Organising, Planning, Measuring performance, Auditing, and Review) to a ‘Plan, Do Check, Act’ approach.

The figure illustrates this model. The HSE has argued that the move toward the Plan, Do Check, Act achieves a better balance between management’s systems and behavioral aspects. It also generally treats health and safety management as an integral part of good management rather than a standalone system. A description of this four-step approach to occupational health and safety management is as follows: 

  • PLAN – establish health and safety management standards based on risk assessment and legal requirements. 
  • DO – implement plans to achieve objectives and standards. 
  • CHECK – measure progress with plans and compliance with standards. 
  • ACT – review against objectives and standards and take appropriate action.
Elements Of Health And Safety Management System

The Plan, Do Check, Act model for occupational health and safety management also forms the basis of the two occupational health and safety management systems: OHSAS 18001 and ILO-OSH 2001.

All recognized occupational health and safety management systems, including HSG65, have some basic and common elements. These are:

  • A planning phase; 
  • A performance phase; 
  • A performance assessment phase; and 
  • A performance improvement phase.

1. Planning phase – PLAN 

The planning phase always includes a policy statement that outlines the organization’s health and safety aims, objectives and commitment, and lines of responsibility. Hazard identification and risk assessment occur during this phase, and the significant hazards may be included in the policy statement. It is important to note that in some reference texts, particularly those in languages other than English, the whole process of hazard identification, risk determination, and the selection of risk reduction or control measures is termed ‘risk assessment.’ However, all three occupational health and safety management systems described in this chapter refer to the individual elements of the process separately and use the term’ risk assessment’ to determine risk only.

Emergency procedures, relevant health and legal safety requirements, and other standards should be developed with appropriate benchmarks from similar industries at the planning stage. An organizational structure must be defined so that health and safety responsibilities are allocated at all levels of the organization and issues such as competent persons and health and safety training are addressed. Realistic targets should be agreed upon within the organization and published as part of the policy.

2. Performance phase – DO

The performance phase (Do) will only be successful if there is good communication at and between all levels of the organization. This implies employee participation as both worker representatives and on safety committees. Effective communication with the workforce, for example, with clear, safe systems of work and other health and safety procedures, will not only aid the implementation and operation of the plan but also produce continual improvement of performance – a key requirement of all occupational health and safety, quality and environmental management systems. Effective communication should also be with other stakeholders, such as regulators, contractors, customers, and trade unions. The performance phase must be monitored regularly since this will indicate an effective occupational health and safety management system and a good health and safety culture within the organization.

8 Elements Of HSE Management System

3. performance assessment phase – CHECK

The performance assessment phase (Check) may be active, reactive, or, ideally, a mixture. Active assessment includes:

  • Work-based inspections and audits.
  • Regular health and safety committee meetings.
  • Feedback from training sessions and a constant review of risk assessments.

Reactive assessment relies on records of accidents, work-related injuries, ill health and near misses, and any enforcement notices. Following an investigation, any recommended remedial or preventative actions must be implemented immediately and monitored regularly. The audit comes in CHECK, but the NEBOSH syllabus places it in the ACT.

4. performance improvement phase – ACT

The performance improvement phase (Act) involves a review of the effectiveness of the health and safety management system and the identification of any weaknesses. The review, which the organization’s management should undertake, will assess whether targets have been met and the reasons for any underperformance. Issues such as available resources, supervisors’ vigilance, and workforce cooperation should be considered at the review stage. When recommendations are made, the review process must define a timescale by which any improvements are implemented, and this part of the process must also be monitored.

Continual improvement implies a commitment to proactively improving performance without waiting for a formal review. Most management systems include an audit requirement, either internal or external, or both. The audit process examines the effectiveness of the whole management process and may act as a control on the review process. Many inquiries on health and safety management issues have asserted that health and safety performance should be subject to audit, like financial performance must be audited.

Health And Safety Management

Major occupational health and safety management systems

Two other major occupational health and safety management systems are in use globally and HSG65. These are as follows: 

  • OHSAS 18001 – 2007 has been developed with the ISO 9000 series for quality management and the ISO 14000 for environmental management. 
  • ILO-OSH 2001 was developed by the International Labour Organisation (ILO) after an extensive study of many worldwide occupational health and safety management systems. It was established as an international system following the Guidelines on occupational safety and health management systems in 2001. It is very similar to OHSAS 18001.

Key characteristics of a health and safety management system

A few key characteristics make up a good health and safety management system. A well-run system will have clear policies and procedures in place and a commitment from management to follow these procedures. Employees should also be regularly trained to safely perform their jobs and effectively communicate health and safety concerns between workers and management. Finally, a good health and safety management system will have ongoing monitoring and evaluation to ensure it works as intended. By following these guidelines, companies can create a safe environment for their workers and help prevent accidents and injuries.

  • An effective health and safety management system should have clear policies and procedures.
  • There should be a commitment from management to follow these procedures.
  • Employees should be regular training on how to safely perform their jobs.
  • Effective communication between workers and management on health and safety concerns should exist.
  • A good health and safety management system will have ongoing monitoring and evaluation to ensure it works as intended.

By following these guidelines, companies can create a safe environment for their workers and help prevent accidents and injuries.

The four basic elements common to all occupational health and safety management systems, as described earlier in this chapter, contain the different activities of the system together with the detailed arrangements and actions required to deliver those activities. However, there are four key characteristics of a successful occupational health and safety management system:

  • A positive health and safety culture; 
  • The involvement of all stakeholders; 
  • An effective audit; and 
  • Continual improvement.
Health And Safety Management Systems

How To Implement a Safety Management System?

Implementing a Safety Management System (SMS) is crucial for any organization that aims to improve its workforce’s safety, health, and well-being. Here is a step-by-step guide on how to do it:

  • Management Commitment: The first step in implementing an SMS is obtaining a commitment from top management. They should understand the value of the SMS and be ready to provide the necessary resources.
  • Establish a Policy: Develop a safety policy demonstrating the organization’s commitment to safety. It should outline the organization’s safety goals and objectives and be communicated to all employees.
  • Identify Hazards and Assess Risks: Conduct a thorough workplace hazard identification and risk assessment process. This will help you understand what could potentially harm your employees and how.
  • Implement Safety Procedures and Controls: Based on the results of your risk assessment, implement safety procedures and controls to mitigate those risks. These could include safety rules, standard operating procedures, use of personal protective equipment, etc.
  • Training and Education: Educate your employees on safety procedures, identifying hazards, and what to do in an emergency. Regularly update and refresh this training.
  • Communicate: Ensure effective communication channels exist to disseminate safety information throughout the organization. Encourage employees to report hazards and unsafe conditions.
  • Monitoring and Measurement: Regularly monitor and measure safety performance. This could be done through safety inspections, audits, and incident investigations.
  • Emergency Preparedness and Response: Have a clear plan for what to do in an emergency. This should include procedures for evacuation, first-aid, firefighting, etc.
  • Continuous Improvement: Regularly review and update the SMS to ensure it remains effective. Make necessary changes based on lessons learned from incidents, changes in operations, or technological advancements.
  • Documentation and Record Keeping: Maintain thorough records of all the above steps. This will provide evidence of your SMS implementation and help you identify trends and areas for improvement.

Implementing an SMS is a continual process that involves a commitment to ongoing improvement. It’s not a one-time activity but a fundamental part of your organization’s operations that should be embedded in its culture.

Conclusion

In conclusion, a Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) is a fundamental cornerstone for businesses to safeguard their most valuable asset – their employees. Key elements such as planning, performance, assessment, and improvement phases play a critical role in ensuring the effectiveness of an HSMS. Implementing an HSMS not only aids in complying with legal requirements but also reduces workplace accidents, boosts employee morale, and enhances a company’s reputation. Therefore, a comprehensive, proactive approach towards health and safety management, coupled with a strong commitment from all levels of the organization, is crucial for creating a safe and productive work environment.

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Author

Malik Imran

Imran is a proficient safety engineer with a solid six-year tenure at ADNOC Company in the United Arab Emirates. His career is marked by an in-depth cultivation of skills and knowledge pivotal for the protection of individuals and the environment within the workplace. His expertise is a vital asset in the continuous pursuit of safety excellence in the engineering domain.