Safety Guidelines While Climbing Fixed Ladders

Safety Guidelines While Climbing Fixed Ladders

Fixed ladders are an increasingly popular way to view the outdoors in a new and exciting manner. However, it’s important to remember that when climbing these types of ladders, safety is paramount. From harnesses and helmets to proper knot-tying techniques and knowledge of potential hazards, there are several key factors to consider before embarking on any fixed ladder excursion – ones that should not be taken lightly or put off until the last minute.

In this blog post, we will discuss the essential safety guidelines for fixed ladder climbers so that you can safely enjoy your next outdoor experience with confidence!

Safety Guidelines While Climbing Fixed Ladders

For fixed ladders that extend more than 24 feet (7.3 m) above a lower level, the employer must ensure the following:

  • Existing fixed ladders: Each fixed ladder installed before November 19, 2018, is equipped with a personal fall arrest system, ladder safety system, cage, or well;
  • New fixed ladders: Each fixed ladder installed on and after November 19, 2018, is equipped with a personal fall arrest system or a ladder safety system;
  • Replacement: When a fixed ladder, cage, or well, or any portion of a section thereof, is replaced, a personal fall arrest system or ladder safety system is installed in at least that section of the fixed ladder, cage, or well where the replacement is located; and
  • Final deadline: On and after November 18, 2036, all fixed ladders are equipped with a personal fall arrest system or a ladder safety system. Example: Ladder Vertical Lifeline System.

When a one-section fixed ladder is equipped with personal fall protection or a ladder safety system or a fixed ladder is equipped with a personal fall arrest or ladder safety system on more than one section, the employer must ensure:

  • The personal fall arrest system or ladder safety system provides protection throughout the entire vertical distance of the ladder, including all ladder sections; and
  • The ladder has rest platforms at maximum intervals of 150 feet (45.7 m).

The employer must ensure ladder sections have a cage or well if:

  • Are offset from adjacent sections; and
  • Have landing platforms provided maximum intervals of 50 feet (15.2 m).
    The employer may use a cage or well in combination with a personal fall arrest system or ladder safety system, provided that the cage or well does not interfere with the system’s operation.

Finally, the employer must ensure that each ladder employee is trained in proper climbing techniques and safety procedures. This includes instruction in knot-tying, body positioning, equipment usage, an inspection of ropes and ladders for wear or damage, and emergency rescue procedures.

In conclusion, practicing safe climbing protocols is essential when utilizing fixed ladders. Following the guidelines outlined in this blog post will help ensure a safe and successful outdoor excursion for yourself and others. Take the time to learn proper safety procedures and always have backup plans before attempting any climbing activities. With these practices, you can feel confident that your next venture into the great outdoors will be enjoyable.

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