Requirements For Personnel Safety While A Load Is Suspended

Requirements For Personnel Safety While A Load Is Suspended

It is essential that safety precautions are taken when a load is suspended. Personnel working in the vicinity of a suspended load must be aware of the potential hazards and take steps to protect themselves from injury. In this blog post, we will discuss the requirements for personnel safety while a load is suspended.

Personnel Safety While A Load Is Suspended

It is essential that safety precautions are taken when a load is suspended. Personnel working in the vicinity of a suspended load must be aware of the potential hazards and take steps to protect themselves from injury. In this blog post, we will discuss the requirements for personnel safety while a load is suspended.

Personnel must avoid being struck by the load when working around a suspended load. They should also avoid being caught between the load and any object, such as a wall or another piece of machinery. In addition, they should not attempt to move the load while it is suspended.

If it is necessary for personnel to be in the vicinity of a suspended load, they should wear personal protective equipment (PPE). This includes items such as hard hats, safety glasses, and gloves. In some cases, wearing fall protection gear may also be necessary.

In addition to taking precautions to protect themselves from injury, personnel working around suspended loads must also be aware of the dangers posed by the load itself. Suspended loads can be unstable and may fall if they are not properly secured. If a suspended load falls, it can cause serious injury or death to anyone in the vicinity.

To avoid these hazards, personnel working around suspended loads must be trained in safe work practices. They should also be aware of the potential risks and know how to safely work in the vicinity of a suspended load. By taking these precautions, personnel can help to ensure their own safety, as well as the safety of those around them.

Keeping Clear of the Load

Section 1425 seeks to protect employees against being struck by a moving or falling load.

Safe Hoisting Routes

Where available, hoisting routes that minimize employees’ exposure to hoisted loads must be used to the extent consistent with public safety.

Stationary Suspended Load

While the operator is not moving a suspended load, no employee may be within the fall zone, except for employees:

  • engaged in hooking, unhooking, or guiding the load;
  • engaged in the initial attachment of the load to a component or structure; or
  • operating a concrete hopper or concrete bucket.

Hooking, Unhooking or Guiding the Load

When employees in the fall zone are engaged in hooking, unhooking, or guiding the load, or are connecting a load to a component or structure, all of the following criteria must be met:

  • The materials being hoisted must be rigged to prevent unintentional displacement.
  • Hooks with self-closing latches or their equivalent must be used. Exception: “J” hooks may be used for setting wooden trusses so that a worker does not need to go onto the truss to open the hook.
  • The materials must be rigged by a qualified rigger.

Receiving a Load

Only employees needed to receive a load is permitted to be within the fall zone when a load is being landed.

Working Around Suspended Loads

Safety While A Load Is Suspended

Many of our member companies agree that there are high risks of serious injury if a
suspended load should fall during pipe-making operations. OSHA has the following to say
about suspended loads and crane operation:

OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.179(n)(3)(vi) states, “The employer shall require that the
operator avoid carrying loads over people.” This is required to protect people from the hazard
of a falling load due to inadvertent failure of the crane mechanism or operator error.
To assist you in making sure you are not faced with a serious accident or injury at your
Facilities, the following are some tips for you to consider at your plant:

  • We all know that a suspended load can come from a crane, forklift, or even jib hoists. But don’t forget that the strong back, forklift mast, forks, or sling can be a suspended load. When someone stands under any of these items, they are at risk of injury.
  • It is best to have a 10′ foot rule. This requires that no one is allowed to be within 10 feet of the area where the load would fall if a failure occurred.
  • For overhead cranes, look at installing remote controls to allow the operation and movement of the crane from a safe distance.
  • Establish specific hand signals for operators and employees and ensure everyone at your plant understands what they mean.
  • If you need to go inside a jacket to open or close a gate, rest the load on a stand or jacks rather than depending on the crane or forks.
  • Ensure that the load rating for slings, chains, or straps equals the rating of the crane, jib, or forklift. If not, always limit the load to the lowest rated part of the lifting system.
  • Always place the forklift forks, strong back, or slings down to the ground when not used, even when they do not carry a load.

Here are some suggestions for moving loads:

  • Guard against shock loading by taking up the slack in the load slowly. Apply power
    cautiously to prevent jerking at the beginning of the lift, and accelerate or decelerate
    slowly.
  • Check the tension on the sling. Raise the load a few inches, stop, and check for proper
    balance and that all items are clear of the path of travel. Never allow anyone to ride on
    the hood or load.
  • Keep all personnel clear while the load is raised, moved, or lowered. Crane or
    hoist operators should watch the load when it is in motion.

Finally, obey the following “nevers:”

  • Never allow more than one person to control a lift or give signals to a crane or hoist
    operator except to warn of a hazardous situation.
  • Never raise the load more than necessary, or leave the load suspended in the air.
  • Never allow anyone to work under a suspended load.

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